The [ add ] command tutorial

The [ add ] command adds an object of your choice to the environment. Running the [add ] command will place the object two (x) coordinates in front of your current location in the direction you’re facing.

image

Check out our Youtube channel for this tutorial in video form, and don’t forget to check out the Beta wiki:

Youtube

Wiki

Play our [ add ] tutorials for a more comprehensive and interactive exploration of the [ add ] command.

To get to the [ add ] tutorial, type [ level play codepopadd0 king 

The codePop Helper Tut

Have you used our codePop Helper yet? Read on and we’ll explain how it works. We’re really excited about this feature. We think it will enable you to create awesome, fun games, and learn codePop at light speed!

The first step is to turn the codePop Helper on. To do that, click on Beta in the upper left hand corner of your screen.  You should now see a screen like this:

Click on the gear icon, and at the bottom of the pop up you will see a box next to the text ‘Codepop Helper’, click on that box. When there is an ‘x’ in the box, the helper is on.

Now that the helper is on, how do you use it?

Firstly you will need to start creating your own level. To create a level type the following. Hint: Don’t name your level levelname like in the example below!

    level create levelname

Now that the helper is on, you’ll notice that your terminal has a list of commands under it. When you type, the Helper will pull all applicable commands depending on the letters you type. For example, if you start typing ‘c' - you will see the following commands:

    col                                                 counter

    clone                                             comment

    class                                              callback

    camera                                          collision

Here’s how that looks:

Let’s use the codePop Helper to change Beta’s height. We start by typing ‘s’ for set. We see that the codePop Helper now provides a list of things you can ‘set’ in your level - beta is the first option. Press spacebar to fill beta into the command. Now you have a list of options you can set beta with. If you type ‘h’ - height will pop up as the first option. Press spacebar to fill in the command with height. Your terminal should look like this:

The last thing you need to do is fill in a number, and Beta’s height will change accordingly. Try it, and don’t forget to mess around with all of the possible commands, there are many!

fastcompany
fastcompany:

Look At These Spectacular Views Of Cities From Space
Seen from space, cities look incredibly detailed at night, when streetlights and buildings glow brightly enough that it’s possible for astronauts to clearly see individual streets. Photos taken from the International Space Station inspired London-based animator Marc Khachfe to spend hours creating this artwork in homage.
Slideshow> Co.Exist

fastcompany:

Look At These Spectacular Views Of Cities From Space

Seen from space, cities look incredibly detailed at night, when streetlights and buildings glow brightly enough that it’s possible for astronauts to clearly see individual streets. Photos taken from the International Space Station inspired London-based animator Marc Khachfe to spend hours creating this artwork in homage.

Slideshow> Co.Exist

Here’s a great list of learning resources for learning how to code. We look forward to getting onto these lists! - Team Beta

Check out this article about some of the work we’ve been doing with the Dwight School this year, and the debate over whether this field will help students with college admissions.

Our answer to the headline - of course! An admissions officer may not see the value in the class itself- but the skills gleaned from learning how to build video games are most certainly valuable to colleges or even employers.

The intellectual process in creating even a simple game or app is very involved. It requires some of the following:

1. The ability to conceptualize a fun/useful process for someone other then yourself. 

2. Understand how to build and where/when to place each element of your game/program

3. Understand how each element interacts with the rest of the elements in your environment (i.e systems thinking)

4. Understand how to take your abstract thinking and apply it through a foreign syntax (i.e code)

There is a lot more to this process.

The value in Beta is that we give players the option to create their own games, and in the process learn a multitude of skills. It also encourages players to view the game from a designer/developer standpoint - a peek behind the curtain if you will. 

We hope that you try Beta out and create a game, so you can judge for yourself! 

-Team Beta